USING EI TO LEAD MULTIGENERATIONAL WORKERS

Using EI to lead multigenerational workers is essential.  In most workplaces, we have four generations working side by side.  And for some, you may even have five. These include the Traditionalists, Baby Boomers, Generation X, Millennials or Generation Y, and Generation Z. A stellar leader with high emotional intelligence (EI) is aware of these generational differences and recognizes that different styles are borne out of different perspectives, which leads to different motivations. The good news is emotional intelligence can be learned and developed. This keynote will demonstrate the differences between each generation and teach you how to tap into your EQ competencies to level the playing field for a multigenerational workforce. 

 

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OVERVIEW OF KEYNOTE

With the Generation Z cohort entering the workforce, we are managing the most diverse workforce than ever before; therefore, using EI to lead multigenerational workers is critical. Traditionalists (ages 76 and up), Baby Boomers (ages 55-75). Generation X (ages 35-54), Millennials or Generation Y (ages 23-34), and the Gen Zers (ages 22 or younger) now must work side by side under one roof. Longer lifespans, delaying retirement, and wanting to begin work earlier are just a few reasons we see such diverse groups, with different education, skill levels, work experience, preferences, and perspectives. 
All five generations are unique and offer their strengths to the workplace. Each generation has opinions on using technology at work, effective communication practices, work-life balance, organizational structures and reporting, work ethic, values, learning and development, career advancement, to name a few. It is critical for you as a leader to know the significant life events that happen to define each generation, pay attention to the general trends that follow, and embrace all of those different inclinations.

“We have the power to make this the best generation of mankind in the history of the world or to make it the last.”

John F. Kennedy

Regardless of which generation we were born into, we are human first, and humans are creatures of emotions. Leading with emotional intelligence is a universal language we all understand and speak. A stellar leader harnesses the power of EI and helps leverage each of your people to do their best work.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

Z

IDENTIFY

The unique characteristics of each of the five generations.

Z

DEFINE

Emotional intelligence, and discover why EI is vital to lead a multigenerational workforce.

Z

COMPARE

And contrast the generational preferences in terms of communication, values, and work ethic.

Z

DISCOVER

The emotional intelligence competencies needed to embrace the diverse workforce.

WHY DO WE NEED USING EI TO LEAD MULTIGENERATIONAL WORKERS?

Let’s face it. People are complicated, and generational variances and differences cast an added level of complexity to the situation. While the generational gap can create a healthy marriage of fresh perspectives and new innovative ideas, it can also lead to culture clashes and internal conflicts within teams. 

Learning how to navigate your way through those differences to leverage each generation’s unique talents and strengths are vital. The answer is connecting at the heart of each individual. Tapping into their internal motivations and passions is going to influence your workers to do their best. “You get the best efforts from others not by lighting a fire beneath them but by lighting a fire within.” Bob Nelson. 

Emotionally intelligent individuals demonstrate better skills in people-oriented functions such as management and customer service. Therefore, it is critical to tap into your people-skills and learn what motivates and ignites passion in each of your employees.

As the Traditionalists are fading out and the Baby Boomers are nearing retirement age, organizations need to prepare Millennials and Gen Zers for leadership roles. We must be equipped to know which emotional intelligence competencies each generation is naturally strong in and which ones need development. Once we understand their leadership gaps, we can create developmental plans for every employee to help them achieve optimal results.